© 2019. Simone Basani and Alice Ciresola

WHAT REMAINS OF A REMBRANDT TORN INTO FOUR EQUAL PIECES AND FLUSHED DOWN THE TOILET

at palazzo fortuny

3 - 10 November 2017

Palazzo Fortuny, Venice, in the context of the exhibition 'Intuition'

performance 

Concept: Simone Basani 

Curatorial support: Alice Ciresola 

Performers: Maïte Álvarez, Bianca Maria Fasiolo, Anna Laura Penna, Elisa Pinna, Marco Tonino

 

What Remains of a Rembrandt Torn into Four Equal Pieces and Flushed Down the Toilet is a performative format for exhibition spaces. It aims to enhance the relationships between the body of the visitors, architecture and the art objects on display.

 

The performance is a tool for narrating the museum space letting hidden stories and unexpected connections emerge. At the same time, it keeps track of a common event (the act of visiting) and makes the spectators conscious of their own presence and choices within the exhibition space. The visitors are ultimately portrayed as performers themselves, as authors of their own ritual choreography within the museum.

 

The performers share with each other a common methodology of observing, memorizing and storytelling. For each observation session, every performer follows discreetly a visitor during the museum tour. While following, the performer memorizes a selection of events concerning the relationship between the visitor, the museum architecture and the art collection. The session ends with the performer telling the visitor about his/her own visit.

 

Specifically, the performance at Palazzo Fortuny is based on the performers’ capability of editing in real time the museum living matter with auto-biographical memories and material belonging to the Palazzo Fortuny archive. In particular, pictures and videos related to the past life and activities of the building throughout the history. 

 

The performance has been possible thanks to Daniela Ferretti (Palazzo Fortuny director and curator) and Davide Daninos (co-curator of the current exhibition 'Intuition').

 

Thanks also to Cristina Da Roit and Claudio Franzini.

 

All pictures: courtesy Palazzo Fortuny, Venice.